Saturday, July 19, 2014
jthenr-comics-vault:

DRAGON BALL"The Training Of Kame Sen’in"By Akira Toriyama

jthenr-comics-vault:

DRAGON BALL
"The Training Of Kame Sen’in"
By Akira Toriyama

doomvault:

I’ll quit if you do.

I’ll quit everything good for you.

And, I’m trying.
Yeah, I’m trying.
But the world’s not sweet enough.
Your love’s not sweet enough.
And I’m not stopping
'Til all my teeth are rotten.

jthenr-comics-vault:

Ryu vs. Dhalsim
STREET FIGHTER II #4 (July 1994)
By Masaomi Kanzaki

Wednesday, July 16, 2014
tonightwedrinktomorrowweride:

Suicidal Tendencies flyer , Santa Cruz Civic Auditorium , 1991 .

tonightwedrinktomorrowweride:

Suicidal Tendencies flyer , Santa Cruz Civic Auditorium , 1991 .

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

(Source: satans-playmate)

Monday, July 14, 2014

(Source: welcometothenba)

The video game industry was quick to industrialise. Where literature, music and cinema had chance to explore their artistic potential away from monetary preoccupations, video games were born into the arcade where, Cinderella-like they had to earn their keep on the bar floor, minute by minute, credit by credit. Atari, one of the earliest video game companies, would playtest its games in select American bars for a fortnight. If the game failed to earn enough money, it would be figuratively thrown out onto the street. In this way video games and money were yoked from an early age. Thereafter, the cultural conversation has always been secondary to the industrial question: how do we monetise this?

But this is only one kind of success story. Video games, like photography, music, cinema and literature, have tremendous value aside from any consideration of financial gain. If the incentive that we present to young people for making games is predominantly a financial one, then we are all the poorer. Video games allow people to express themselves and present the ways in which they experience and interact with the world and its systems in a unique way to others. Games are, predominantly, a way for self-expression and enrichment and yet the conversation is primarily focused on the “how” of making a living than the “what” of what might be possible within the medium’s bounds.

Simon Parkin is probably the best writer on videogames working today, maybe ever. Here he is over at New Statesman, talking all things this. (via kierongillen)
Sunday, July 13, 2014
self-termination:

i-nagato:

Ominous Doctrines Of The Perpetual Mystical Macrocosm


Whoa

self-termination:

i-nagato:

Ominous Doctrines Of The Perpetual Mystical Macrocosm

Whoa